Posts Tagged ‘garmin’

Riverside Drive and a New To Me Garmin

I am solidly six weeks into marathon training.  So far it has been pretty good, with some ups and some downs.  Last week was an unusually down week, with a change in my diet and some insomnia creating a period of very low energy, before bouncing back by the end of the week.  I felt really amazing Thursday through Saturday.  Otherwise . . .

 

So yesterday, I suffered one of my worst runs ever.  It was an 11 mile route along the always challenging Riverside Drive.  Now, I like Riverside, and ran it voluntarily and solitary about 3 weeks ago for a 9 mile route.  But like it or not, it is very, very challenging.

 

I meant to write about how I was gifted last Monday with a used Garmin and how it has been a help and a hurt in my running.  A help in that I can do a better job of maintaining the pace I want and even speed it up, and a hurt in that I can look at my current pace and feel intense despair over how slow it seems compared to the effort I am exerting (see the mention of low energy above, though too).  Anyway, against my instincts and a reasonable suggestion from the donator, I decided to wear it yesterday for the long run with Team Cocoa.

 

So, first things first: thanks to the Garmin, I know that in my attempt to stay with the main pack, I ran my first mile of 11 at a 10:20 pace, which for me, for a long run, is WAY TOO DAMN FAST.  Add to that that within the first mile, even holding a low to mid-10 min per mile pace, I was falling quickly to the back of the pack.  I was among the last 3 by mile 5.  This was not a good place for me to be, mentally, though at this point, I was physically doing well and looking forward to the remaining 6 miles.

 

Once we got on Riverside Drive itself, after the absolute brutal climb up from the Nickel Bridge to Forest Hill Avenue, I started feeling that awful feeling in my stomach:  I needed a little blue house and I needed it soon.  Miles 5 and 6 were tough, hilly, and my stomach was cramping. I was running with the last two team members and Coach Adam who always brings up the rear.

 

At mile 7, when we got to the main entrance to the Buttermilk Trail very close to the Lee Bridge, I found the much needed rest-stop and assured the team I could find my own way home (it was a very straightforward and familiar route anyway).  After suffering miserably in the sweatbox of the porta-john, I came out feeling a little light headed but got underway again to cross the Lee Bridge, a portion of the route that I enjoy the most, which no one else seems to.  After the shady but very still and moist air of Riverside Drive, the strong breezes that blow above Belle Isle and the James River feel very refreshing to me.

 

But it was once I was across the bridge that everything fell to shambles.  My legs felt like I was running through wet cement.  If I closed my eyes, I saw blue sparkles.  The lightheadedness became more pronounced.  I tried running for a block and walking for a block for a while, drinking my water, and hoping to find a second wind.

 

It never came.  I decided it was time to trim the route a little (by then, there was simply no short cut back to the stadium), and I cut the diagonal across Monroe Park, and rather than follow Monument back to the Boulevard, I made my way to Broad, again, to slightly cut the diagonal of the route, and took the walk of shame for the last 3 miles.

 

My body hurt in ways that seemed to have nothing to do with running.  My sides and back hurt.  The pressure of my running bra on my shoulders was nearly unbearable.  The cuff of my tights around the base of my knees felt awful.  I was a massive ball of pain for reasons unknown.

 

It was crazy to collapse like that, because the previous weekend, I had run 10 miles, hopped in the car, drove 4 hours into the mountains, and set up a camp and was quite physically active for the rest of the day, only slightly tired from my early morning exertions.  After yesterday, the best I could do was pour myself into a Epsom salt bath and then sleep for 4 or 5 hours afterwards.  I don’t know that I would have gotten up when I did except Byram said “The World Cup is starting” and I was up like a shot.  To go back to lying on the couch.

 

What caused the collapse?  Was it because I didn’t eat a little something before I ran?  Was it because I never took a rest day last week and even doubled up workouts a couple of days (running and power yoga)?  Was it because I had too much water and not enough electrolytes?  Was it because I had GI troubles both before and during the run (probably caused by the very greasy smoked bratwurst I had for dinner the night before)?  Not enough sleep?  Not enough calories?  Too much heat?  Too fast at the start?  The very challenging route?  All of the above???

 

It was probably all of the above and even some factors I haven’t considered yet.  It was enough to leave me wondering if maybe I am not cut out for a marathon yet, though.  Maybe I should switch over to the half marathon before I do more serious damage?  No, I don’t really believe that.  My coworker and the donator of the Garmin reassured me this morning that sometimes these runs happen, and he recalled having to stop on the exact same route a few years back and recover before he could make the last 3 miles back to the stadium.  Of course, he hasn’t managed a full marathon yet, either, and he has been running for many years more than I have.

 

I feel like I only write when things go wrong, but what is there to say about Saturday morning’s humid 5.5 mile run that went just fine (except, again, for some stomach cramps right at 4.5 miles)?  I felt great on Saturday  Even despite  the GI distress, I felt good enough on Saturday to add a little length to the route and take a fast sprint down a steep hill on a side street near my house.  How did my weekend workouts go from so right on Saturday to so wrong on Sunday?  I can’t explain it.

 

So today begins a 3-day liquid fast for me.  I decided last week that I needed a total body reboot and I have had success with these fasts in the past.  My diet will consist of 3-4 protein shakes a day, as much water, herbal tea, and coffee as I want, and a cup of bullion a day (I need the salt in this heat).  I know this will bring my energy levels down somewhat for the next few days, but I can accept that trade for a reduction in water weight, a renewed focus on what I put in my mouth, and usually an end to sugar and carb cravings.

 

Today is cross-training day and I plan to get on the rowing machine for 30 minutes at lunch.  Tomorrow is 3 miles at home, 6 miles on Wednesday, and 3 miles again on Thursday.  I have been adding in yoga and core training workouts from Byram’s Diamond Dallas Page YRG yoga videos.  Those have been very effective and I can discern a real difference in things like my downward dogs (heels are down after a the first few minutes of any workout), my Three Legged Dog is getting taller and less wobbly, and my lunges are definitely getting stronger and more stable.  So while still not a fan of ordinary main-stream yoga routines, I am having fun and finding success with DDP’s yoga, as much as I cringe at some of his more sexist comments, or roll my eyes at the alternative names he gives to some of his poses.

 

So, feeling better today, I refuse to let yesterday’s awfulness stop me yet.  I have 18 more weeks until race day.  I am sure there will be other horrible workouts in all of those miles, and I am also sure I will have some stellar days.  I have particular faith that when the mercury starts to fall and the humidity comes down out of the “breathing underwater” range, that my workouts will improve.  Just writing all this out has helped improve how I feel about yesterday and how I feel about going forward with Team Cocoa and my status as the sweeper.

 

I will keep on working at staying positive (hard for me) and keep racking up the miles (less hard).